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Anorexia nervosa

aka ANA

A type of eating disorder in which an individual has a low body weight, a fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of body weight. Behaviors that are common in individuals with anorexia involve restricting food intake, exercising excessively, purging and using laxatives, diet aids, diuretics or enemas, in order to control weight gain. Physical signs of anorexia include, but are not limited to: severe weight loss, fatigue, insomnia, lethargy, dizziness, fainting, hair thinning, constipation, dry or yellow skin, feeling cold, amenorrhea, irregular heart rate, low blood pressure, osteoporosis and lanugo. Emotional and behavioral signs of anorexia include, but are not limited to: intense preoccupation with food, fear of gaining weight, depression, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, irritability, compulsive behaviors, eating alone, substance abuse, reduced self-esteem and perfectionism. Individuals with anorexia frequently link their self-worth to body image and become obsessive about maintaining an unrealistic perception of themselves. Over time, anorexia can lead to serious complications and organ failure. It is important that individuals who seek treatment recognize that anorexia is more than just a physical struggle, but is a mental and emotional battle as well.

 

Bulimia nervosa

aka MIA

A type of eating disorder characterized by binging and purging behaviors that, according to the DSM-5, occur at least once a week over a period of three months. Individuals will consume a larger than average amount of food in a discrete period of time and feel a lack of control over the amount of food that they are consuming. After a period of binge eating, individuals will engage in compensatory behaviors such as vomiting or using laxatives, diuretics or enemas. Unlike individuals with anorexia, individuals with bulimia frequently have a normal or even higher than normal body weight. Similar to those with anorexia nervosa, individuals with bulimia may place an increased important on body image and have distorted perceptions of their bodies.  A tell-tale sign of bulimia is a physical indication of vomiting (e.g. calluses on knuckles, damage to teeth, sore throat, dehydration), but many of the physical, emotional and behavioral signs are similar to those in individuals with anorexia. 

 

Binge Eating Disorder

aka BED

a type of eating disorder in which individuals consume a larger than average amount of food in a discrete period of time and feel a lack of control over the amount of food that they are consuming at least once a week over a period of three months. The DSM-5 associates binge eating disorder with three or more of the following: eating much more rapidly than normal, eating until uncomfortably full, eating large quantities of food when not hungry, eating alone because of feelings of embarrassment, feeling angry with oneself after a period of binging. Binge eating disorder is not associated with the compensatory behaviors such as vomiting or abusing laxatives that are associated with bulimia. 

 

EATING DISORDERS NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIEd

aka EDNOS

A category of eating disorders that do not fit into the categories described above, but still cause individuals significant concern, have similar signs and symptoms to the eating disorders described above and should be treated just as seriously. Atypical anorexia nervosa is a type of eating disorder in which individuals exhibit all of the signs and symptoms of anorexia nervosa, but maintain a normal or higher than normal weight. Bulimia nervosa of low frequency and/or limited duration, binge eating disorder of low frequency and/or limited duration, purging disorder and night eating syndrome are other categories of OSFED specified by the DSM-5. 

 
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60%

of the people who seek eating disorder treatment get better and go on to live health, fulfilling lives.

70%

of people with an eating disorder will not seek teatment for one reason or another.

 

Recovery Wins

Let's tip the scales in our favor
And take back our lives together.

 
 


Sources

  • Mirasol Eating Disorder Treatment Center (2017) "Eating Disorder Facts" Article Link

  • Gupta, S., PhD (February 8, 2013) "The Risk Of Suicide Among People Suffering From Bulimia" Article Link